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Master Course Outline
PHIL 103
Asian Philosophy


Credits: 5
Clock Hours per Quarter: 50

AA Discipline: [Humanities] [Diversity]

Lecture Hours:50


Description
This course introduces central ideas, metaphors, and images of the philosophical/religious traditions of East Asia: students define, differentiate, and interpret concepts of value, self, and reality, as well as unique concepts in Eastern social and political philosophy and aesthetics in Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, and other traditions of India, China, Korea and Japan.

Intended Learning Outcomes
  • Recognize, explain, and assess the unique terminology commonly used in a variety of Asian world-views.
  • Interpret and creatively analyze the diverse views of a variety of Asian world-views (e.g. Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Taoism).
  • Express awareness and appreciate of the value of diversity in religious and moral values and in diverse cultures and world-views.
  • Identify specific concepts and values in a variety of Asian world-views and illustrate them by relating them to specific situations in their own lives. (For example, each student will apply and analyze the Confucian idea of [i]jen[/i] in a real personal conflict situation currently present in her or his own life.)
  • Analyze the history of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Taoism by showing their interrelations. For example, students should be able to identify and distinguish Taoist and Confucian ideas and elucidate their key differences.
  • Explain the positions various Eastern philosophies take on specific issues and apply them to contemporary issues.
  • Summarize essential readings of major philosophical works studied in the course.
  • Evaluate each philosophy for its apparent strengths and weaknesses. Specify not only these strengths and weaknesses, but be able to criticize the limitations of the presuppositions of thought used in their own analyses.
  • Reveal a robust grasp of Eastern philosophical and aesthetic ideas by observing and analyzing works of art: paintings, sumi-e, music, and pertinent art films.
  • Create their own works consistent with specified aesthetic principles. For example, they will compose Zen haiku consistent with Zen principles of aesthetics and then justify their claims to using those principles.

  • Course Topics
  • What is philosophy - reality, existence, knowledge, values, reason, mind, language
  • Key differences between Eastern and Western culture and philosophy
  • Taoism - "Daoedejing" [Tao Teh Ching of Lao Tzu] (J.Wu) - "The Zhuangzi"
  • Buddhism - Teachings of the Buddha [Kornfield] - "The Dhammapada"
  • Zen Buddhism, Haiku, and the "ZHA"
  • Confucianism
  • Hinduism - "The Upanishads" - "The Bhagavad-Gita"

  • Syllabi Listing See ALL Quarters
    Course
    Year Quarter
    Item
    Instructor  
    PHIL 103
    Winter 2015
    1455
    Jesse Burgess
    PHIL 103
    Summer 2013
    9669
    Krzysztof Piekarski
    PHIL 103
    Spring 2011
    1842
    Jon Stratton
    PHIL 103
    Spring 2009
    0611
    Jon Stratton
    PHIL 103
    Spring 2007
    1842
    Jon Stratton


    Two Year Projected Schedule

    Year One* Year Two**
    Fall
    Winter
    Spring
    Summer
    Mini 
    Fall
    Winter
    Spring
    Summer
    Mini
    X
    X
    X
    X
     
    X
    X
     
    X
     

    *If fall quarter starts on an odd year (2003, 2005, etc.), it's Year One.
    **
    If fall quarter starts on an even year (2002, 2004, etc.), it's Year Two.