Sociology

SOC-085: Cultural Diversity, Credits = 5
Examination of the social, historical, economic, and cultural factors that influence society's treatment of members of various racial and ethnic groups. It acquaints the student with an understanding of how social structures are organized in terms of minority-majority relations, for the advantage of some at the expense of others.

SOC-107: Human Services Field Experience I, Credits = 1 - 3
Provides a supervised experience in a social agency, school, health care facility, youth group, etc. in the local community. This course is part of WWCC's Human Services program. Requires 30 hours per credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

SOC-108: Human Services Field Experience II, Credits = 1 - 3
Provides a supervised experience in a social agency, school, health care facility, youth group, etc. in the local community. This course is part of WWCC's Human Services program. Requires 30 hours per credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

SOC-109: Human Services Field Experience III, Credits = 1 - 3
Provides a supervised experience in a social agency, school, health care facility, youth group, etc. in the local community. This course is part of WWCC's Human Services program. Requires 30 hours per credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

SOC-110: Human Services Field Experience IV, Credits = 1 - 3
Provides a supervised experience in a social agency, school, health care facility, youth group, etc. in the local community. This course is part of WWCC's Human Services program. Requires 30 hours per credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

SOC-150: Introduction to Social Work, Credits = 5
Introduction to the field of social work including an examination of the knowledge, values, and skills influencing the role of the social worker in a variety of practice settings.

SOC-160: Introduction to Human Geography, Credits = 5
Analyzes human populations, cultures, activities and connections within the physical landscapes they live on are discussed. The study of the spatial variations among the human cultures and patterns of interaction between humans and the environment are introduced. Student may not earn credit for both SOC 160 and GEOG 160.

SOC-164: Investigating the Dynamics of Socioeconomic Classes, Credits = 2
Explores the relationships that exist between socio-economic classes and helps create awareness on the values, priorities, and resources pertaining to those classes. Recommended: READ 088

SOC-204: Drugs and Society, Credits = 5
Introduction to the many and varied drugs, and their related sociocultural history of use and abuse. The physiological and psychological study of symptoms and disease concepts. A review of chemical dependency and the nature of social control as expressed through treatment, rehabilitation, education, family structure, community, and other social responses. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.

SOC-205: Racial and Ethnic Relations, Credits = 5
Focuses on intergroup race and ethnic relations with a social-historical emphasis. Students explore how race and ethnic identities are developed; theoretical perspectives on assimilation and pluralism; prejudice and discrimination; the creation of subordinate groups; and historical and contemporary issues. Problems and possible solutions of majority-minority relations are examined. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. [SS] [^D]

SOC-206: Social Gerontology and the Aging Revolution, Credits = 5
Looks at the effects of the aging population of society, life/health insurance, retirement planning, and resources for the elderly, discussing the individual and group behaviors with respect to health and illness. Examination of medical professionals and their behaviors, with a look at the human behavioral responses to health, illness and the aging process. The distinction between culture and the process of death, dying and bereavement will be analyzed as it relates to the physical, mental and social changes in people as they age. Emphasis on the aging process itself. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement.

SOC-208: Sociology of Intimate and Family Relations, Credits = 5
Provides a sociological understanding of the processes involved in family relations, household life and structures, and family problems. Emphasizes historical formations, social influences, and the diversity of families in the United States. Explores myths about family forms and features; the role of gender; divisions of labor within household; historical shifts; family privacy and government interventions; stereotypes; and the effect of social, economic, and political forces on the family. Also addresses the broader issues in the sociology of intimate relations beyond conventional marriages and families. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. [SS][^D]

SOC-210: Contemporary Social Issues, Credits = 5
Course for curious students who like to delve deeply into hot-topic current issues. The quarterly theme is determined in advance based on the results of recent student polling. Using valid sources and digital resources students explore sociological approaches to understanding diverse perspectives regarding key current issues. Examples of prospective hot topics include immigration policies, sustainability, corporate crime, prison industry, healthcare reform, war, social impact of climate change, globalization, social consequences of demographic changes (e.g. aging population), social movements, or other emerging and current social issues. Typically only one current issue, or perhaps two related ones, is closely examined each quarter. Contact the instructor for specific quarterly theme.

SOC-220: Gender and Society, Credits = 5
Gender is a central feature of social life. Enhances students' recognition of the pervasiveness and complexities of a sex and gender "system," predominately focusing on our own society. Gender is explored on three levels (individual identity, gender roles, and institutional level) to include as a system of social relationships in which gender interacts with, and influences, institutional structures; as what people "do" in social interactions; and as an attribute by individuals for self-identification. Student may not earn credit for both SOC 220 and WST 220. Course taken prior to fall 2010 also accepted for diversity requirement. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.

SOC-226: Community Leadership, Credits = 6
The Sherwood Trust Community Leadership Program was established by the Ford Institute for Community in 2000, and is funded by the Ford Family Foundation. This structured 60-hour curriculum is offered to citizens in small towns, such as Walla Walla. The objective is to cultivate community leadership skills with individuals from diverse backgrounds, from different economic and social sectors, and of diverse ages. An outcome of this program is for the class to identify a specific community project to be completed by the following winter quarter. This course is available to current participants in the Sherwood Trust Community Leadership Program only. Prerequisite: Instructor permission required.

SOC-227: Community Leadership Service Project, Credits = 1
The Sherwood Trust Community Leadership Program was established by the Ford Institute for Community in 2000, and is funded by the Ford Family Foundation. This 30-hours of community service learning component is the outgrowth of SOC 226. The objective is to cultivate community leadership skills with individuals from diverse backgrounds, from different economic and social sectors, and of diverse ages. An outcome of this program is for the class to identify a specific community project to be completed by the following winter quarter. This course is available to current participants in the Sherwood Trust Community Leadership Program only.

SOC-230: Medical Sociology, Credits = 5
Medical Sociology will look at the relationship and interaction between the biological and social factors of health and illness. Topics covered include correlations within the health care systems, individual well-being, real-perceived illnesses, and the notion of our medicalized body. Social stress, health behaviors, the environment, and the distribution of illnesses in the United States have impacted our health and health care system are examined. Recommended: READ 088 or higher.

SOC-250: Honors Seminar: Zen Sociology, Credits = 2
This honors seminar explores Zen Sociology, which sociologist Bernard McGrane describes as "applied meditation". As with all sociology courses, the relation between society and self is explored. Using McGrane's book, The Un-TV and the 10MPH Car: Experiments in Personal Freedom and Everyday Life, students will observe and experience everyday life in a new, eye-opening, outside-of-the-box manner. Prerequisite: Member of Honors program or instructor permission.